@j.money.art - J MONEY ART

Cuz art imitates life. LA⚡️NY

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Monday: I don’t think ur ready 4 this jelly⁣
Me: Agreed ⁣⁣
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“Perseus with the Head of Medusa” by Antonio Canova, 1804–6⁣
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Monday: I don’t think ur ready 4 this jelly⁣ Me: Agreed ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ “Perseus with the Head of Medusa” by Antonio Canova, 1804–6⁣

Abstract, like my diy butterfly nail art. It was MEANT to look like blobs, ur just not seeing my vision !! 🦋
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Abstract, like my diy butterfly nail art. It was MEANT to look like blobs, ur just not seeing my vision !! 🦋

The Museum of Street Art is a 20-floor, vertical museum celebrating the art of 5 Pointz. 
The original 5 Pointz was an iconic, NY graffiti landmark in Queens that was demolished in 2013. @citizenM and @5Pointzcreates worked together to bring its spirit back to life. @mosabowery was born, a 21 floor descent into graffiti greatnessCurated by @mariebrittanytobk
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The Museum of Street Art is a 20-floor, vertical museum celebrating the art of 5 Pointz. The original 5 Pointz was an iconic, NY graffiti landmark in Queens that was demolished in 2013. @citizenm and @5pointzcreates worked together to bring its spir

*hot* new drop alertlol art terms!! Quick and dirty explanations and examples of art terms so you can flex on all ur friends and learn more about art! I’ll be posting these every few days, hope you enjoy ️
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*hot* new drop alertlol art terms!! Quick and dirty explanations and examples of art terms so you can flex on all ur friends and learn more about art! I’ll be posting these every few days, hope you enjoy ️

“So can I buy you a whiteclaw?” ⁣
• Picasso painted this at just 24 years old. It was the only painting by Picasso on permanent view in Paris from 1905 to 1912. Seems crazy considering how famous he ended up becoming. ⁣
• The chic af woman in this painting is Germaine Pichot, who is one of Picasso’s many former lovers. Fun fact! She was also one of the models in Picasso's famous Les Demoiselles d'Avignon.⁣
• Picasso paints Pichot as a femme fatale, a seductive woman who ultimately brings men disaster. Lol. Unfortunately, Picasso’s close friend Casagemas also fell in love and became obsessed with her. Due to a case of unrequited love, he committed suicide in 1901. This became a heavy weight on Picasso. ⁣
• The painting was commissioned by Frédé Gérard, the owner of this bar. It was the hot, sceney, bohemian nightclub at the time. Gérard is the one playing the guitar in the back left, almost camouflaged against the wall. Meanwhile a self portrait of Picasso takes centerstage. #Typical⁣
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“At the Lapin Agile” by Pablo Picasso, 1905⁣
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“So can I buy you a whiteclaw?” ⁣ • Picasso painted this at just 24 years old. It was the only painting by Picasso on permanent view in Paris from 1905 to 1912. Seems crazy considering how famous he ended up becoming. ⁣ • The chic af woman in this pa

I time traveled to my 1960s Neo-Futurism dreamland.⁣⁣⁣
• I stopped by the new TWA hotel at JFK when I flew into New York and died over its design. The hotel’s main entrance is the og headhouse of the TWA Flight Center airline terminal that was designed in 1962 by architect/designer legend Eero Saarinen. ⁣⁣⁣
• The hotel stays authentic to its roots with its iconic red carpeted “tube” corridors and original 1962 split-flap departure board, that was literally there since its opening.⁣⁣⁣
• I love Neo-Futurism architecture. The movement emerged in the 1960s and focused on simplifying design down to essential forms. So think clean looking lines, no extra unnecessary decoration, crisp colors and overall the feel of speed. To me Neo-Futurism evokes this feeling like its about to blast-off. The movement was all about technology as a positive force for a better, more modern future.⁣
• In 1994, this terminal was declared a city landmark by the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission. ⁣
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I time traveled to my 1960s Neo-Futurism dreamland.⁣⁣⁣ • I stopped by the new TWA hotel at JFK when I flew into New York and died over its design. The hotel’s main entrance is the og headhouse of the TWA Flight Center airline terminal that was design

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Jean-Michel Basquiat died on this day. His artistic career only lasted 8 feverish years, cut short by his death at just 27 years old, yet his impact on art and the world was vast and unforgettable. ⁣
• Basquiat grew up in Park Slope, Brooklyn. His father was Haitian and his mother was Puerto-Rican. By age 11 he was already fluent in French, English and Spanish. Basquiat had a tough childhood, but his talent for art flourished despite his circumstances. ⁣
• By the 1980s, Basquiat rose to fame in the art scene as he transitioned from anonymous New York graffiti artist to internationally acclaimed Neo-Expressionist. ⁣
• A common, key theme in Basquiat’s art is the human skull, the head. His mother gave him the book, Gray’s Anatomy when he was just a kid, and was influenced by it ever since. He became fascinated with the internal workings of the human body. He also became intensely focused on showing human emotion, thoughts and internal struggle in his art. His depictions of heads and skulls, with quick and busy brushstrokes represent all of this internal activity. ⁣
• Whenever I’m looking at Basquiat’s art, I feel so energized. It’s like the words, faces and lines are electrically charged and it’s just contagious. ⁣
• “I don't think about art when I'm working. I try to think about life.” - Basquiat⁣
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“Melting Point of Ice” by Jean-Michel Basquiat 1984⁣
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Jean-Michel Basquiat died on this day. His artistic career only lasted 8 feverish years, cut short by his death at just 27 years old, yet his impact on art and the world was vast and unforgettable. ⁣ • Basquiat grew up in Park Slope, Brooklyn. His fa

Matisse MOOD ⁣
Drawing is like making an expressive gesture with the advantage of permanence. - Henri Matisse⁣
For Matisse, drawing was one of the most intimate forms of expression. Some of his favorite subjects involved female forms or nude figures. Matisse believed that drawings could capture an artist’s most direct thoughts and emotion. ⁣Obsessed with how just a few lines can convey this much personality and sass. ⁣
“Nadia. Smiling Face” Henri Matisse, 1948⁣
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Matisse MOOD ⁣ "Drawing is like making an expressive gesture with the advantage of permanence." - Henri Matisse⁣ For Matisse, drawing was one of the most intimate forms of expression. Some of his favorite subjects involved female forms or nude figure

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Getting the aperol spritzes and cheese board ready lol jk more like tequila shots and salsa #tgif ⁣
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“Still life with peeled orange and bunch of grapes” by Albertus Steenbergen, 1824 - 1900⁣
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Getting the aperol spritzes and cheese board ready lol jk more like tequila shots and salsa #tgif ⁣ ⁣ “Still life with peeled orange and bunch of grapes” by Albertus Steenbergen, 1824 - 1900⁣

@teamlab’s immersive museum in Tokyo has become the world’s most visited single-artist museum. They’ve had 2.3 million visitors in its first yearThat shit crazy! But I’m also not surprised at all since @teamlab_borderless @teamlab.planets ended up being my favorite experiences in Tokyo. It’s definitely not an “instagram” museum. It’s insanely creative, immersive and unlike anything I’ve ever seen. I spent about 4 hours there and felt like I could have stayed all day because it was that fucking beautiful and cool. Cannot wait for them to expand into the US
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@teamlab ’s immersive museum in Tokyo has become the world’s most visited single-artist museum. They’ve had 2.3 million visitors in its first yearThat shit crazy! But I’m also not surprised at all since @teamlab_borderless @teamlab.planets ended up be

Can’t take me anywhere #angles 
• “The spider is a repairer. If you bash into the web of a spider, she doesn’t get mad. She weaves and repairs it.” ― Louise Bourgeois
• The spider was more than a terrifying, creepy insect to Louise Bourgeois. The spider represented a lot of different things from an emotional and psychological level. She saw spiders as an allusion of both herself and her mother. They were industrious and protective, small yet fearsome, graceful and clever. • One of Bourgeois’ early childhood experiences that shaped her views on spiders is from her family’s country home. She once said, “We suffered from mosquitoes...The only help was the spider. The spider is a friend.” “The Nest” by Louise Bourgeois, 1994
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Can’t take me anywhere #angles • “The spider is a repairer. If you bash into the web of a spider, she doesn’t get mad. She weaves and repairs it.” ― Louise Bourgeois • The spider was more than a terrifying, creepy insect to Louise Bourgeois. The spi

lol Futura Bold Oblique should be renamed to Barbara Kruger. From her signature font, challenging/satirical statement and massive crown, this bold artwork is quintessential Kruger. The scattered, isolated words force you to piece together the sentence and rethink what it really means. The word “Person barely makes it onto the center of the canvas, while the wannabe boujee, gold crown is trying way too hard to look important #thirsty. Kruger questions aphorisms and and cultural clichés by pairing them with pop culture and mass media imagery. ⁣ ⁣⁣
Untitled (You are a very special person) by Barbara Kruger, 1995⁣⁣ @thebroadmuseum
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lol Futura Bold Oblique should be renamed to Barbara Kruger. From her signature font, challenging/satirical statement and massive crown, this bold artwork is quintessential Kruger. The scattered, isolated words force you to piece together the sentenc

Hot girl summer alertI aspire to have the confidence of the Roman goddess Venus, casually dgaf lounging on a sea monster. This sea goat is actually the astrological sign for Capricorn which symbolizes lust, while Venus symbolizes love and desire. (Seems like an aligned pair to me.) I think this relief randomly caught my eye because of Venus’ complete confidence. She is nonchalantly chilling on a sea monster, being her best self and sometimes you just need those vibes.  #wcw⁣⁣ #hotgirlsummer ⁣⁣
“Venus Reclining on a Sea Monster with Cupid and a Putto” by John Deare, 1787-1798⁣⁣ @gettymuseum
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Hot girl summer alertI aspire to have the confidence of the Roman goddess Venus, casually dgaf lounging on a sea monster. This sea goat is actually the astrological sign for Capricorn which symbolizes lust, while Venus symbolizes love and desire. (Se

Hbd Andy⁣⁣
• What’s with the Brillo? Andy Warhol stirred shit up with his Brillo Boxes that he exhibited in 1964. He created perfect reproductions of the 1960s packaging that Brillo pads came in, arranged them in an art gallery, leaving critics and viewers shocked. ⁣
• Many people were confused as to why boxes of dish pads, stacked up as if they’re just in a grocery store stock room...were in an art gallery? Warhol wanted to create tension and comparison between a commercial, everyday item and the seemingly pristine space of the art gallery. Warhol once said in reference to his boxes, that he “wanted something ordinary.”⁣⁣ ⁣
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Hbd Andy⁣⁣ • What’s with the Brillo? Andy Warhol stirred shit up with his Brillo Boxes that he exhibited in 1964. He created perfect reproductions of the 1960s packaging that Brillo pads came in, arranged them in an art gallery, leaving critics and v

Let me tell you why this is crazy similar to an Impressionist artwork. Created by Roy Lichtenstein, this is based on the Rouen Cathedral series by Monet that I just posted. (omfg it is so satisfying when my back to back posts are cohesive lol.) This is so clearly a Lichtenstein with those benday dots (think the old school comic book printing technique) and bright, commercial print colors. How does this Pop Art series share strong similarities to Monet’s Impressionist art? Both artists focused on unmixed colors. Instead different colors are placed side by side in order to emphasize or bring out certain tones. Another similarity the open brushstrokes of Impressionism that transform into more modern ben day dots. When you’re up close to both, you see the empty space and distinct colors of each. ⁣
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“Rouen Cathedral, Set 5” by Roy Lichtenstein, 1969⁣ (obvi I only focused in on 3 of the 5 here)
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Let me tell you why this is crazy similar to an Impressionist artwork. Created by Roy Lichtenstein, this is based on the Rouen Cathedral series by Monet that I just posted. (omfg it is so satisfying when my back to back posts are cohesive lol.) This

Everything changes, even stone. Claude Monet ⁣
Monet would often paint the same subject repeatedly, during different times of the day to capture the changing light conditions and show what a radical difference it makes. The Rouen Cathedral is his most intense focus on a particular subject. It was a heavy, stressful weight on him and even had nightmares about it. He was obsessed with capturing the light on this cathedral yet felt like it was an impossible task. He painted a total of 30 but only chose 20 paintings for an exhibition in Paris in 1895. Why paint the same thing over and over? To Monet, light was just as important as the subject he was painting. He wanted to show how it can completely change the way we perceive the world around us. ⁣
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“The Portal of Rouen Cathedral in Morning Light” by Claude Monet, 1894⁣ @gettymuseum
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"Everything changes, even stone." Claude Monet ⁣ Monet would often paint the same subject repeatedly, during different times of the day to capture the changing light conditions and show what a radical difference it makes. The Rouen Cathedral is his m

You ain't my boyfriend, and I ain't your girlfriend, but you don't want me to see nobody else and I don't want you to see nobody! WHO ELSE CAN’T STOP SINGING THIS @arianagrande ⁣⁣
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And now not to ruin the mood, but this painting shows the tragic story of Venus and Adonis. Venus is trying to convince Adonis not to go off on a hunt, but he’s like nahhhh I’m going hunting anyway. In the background we see Cupid, who is NOT doing his job (YOU ONLY HAD ONE JOB), and is instead sleeping. This is a symbol of Adonis not listening to Venus’ loving pleas. In the end, Adonis goes on the hunt and is sadly killed by a wild boar. Tragic af. Ok if you need me I’ll be listening to Boyfriend on repeat bye.⁣⁣
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“Venus and Adonis” by Titian 1555–1560⁣⁣
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You ain't my boyfriend, and I ain't your girlfriend, but you don't want me to see nobody else and I don't want you to see nobody! WHO ELSE CAN’T STOP SINGING THIS @arianagrande ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ And now not to ruin the mood, but this painting shows the tragic st

Half empty or half full? 🥛FULL AS FUCK. Happy Monday, YOU GOT THIS! ⁣
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Wayne Thiebauld is most known for painting iconic imagery from pop culture, classic food and quiet moments from everyday life in America. Thiebaud worked in a cafe when he was young and was inspired by the brightly lit display cases and his surroundings. I’m a huge fan of Thiebauld and his use of heavy pigment and saturated colors. Somehow an everyday item, like a glass of water, requires reexamination as it comes alive through thick strokes of paint.⁣
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“Drink” by Wayne Thiebaud, 1999⁣
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Half empty or half full? 🥛FULL AS FUCK. Happy Monday, YOU GOT THIS! ⁣ ⁣ Wayne Thiebauld is most known for painting iconic imagery from pop culture, classic food and quiet moments from everyday life in America. Thiebaud worked in a cafe when he was yo

Distracted by those @gettymuseum curves.
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Distracted by those @gettymuseum curves.

Waves don’t die 〰️⁣
I spent the day floating around The Getty Museum, one of my favorite places in LA. Located on a hill overlooking the infamous 405 freeway and its gridlock traffic, The Getty feels like an airy, tranquil oasis, completely immune to the chaos going on below. The $1.3 billion museum opened in 1997 and I wish I lived here lol. ⁣
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Waves don’t die 〰️⁣ I spent the day floating around The Getty Museum, one of my favorite places in LA. Located on a hill overlooking the infamous 405 freeway and its gridlock traffic, The Getty feels like an airy, tranquil oasis, completely immune to

Remember what I said yesterday about Canova’s plaster at @metmuseum? Well sryyy today’s a new day and modeling in plaster is overrated with Henry Moore! Also he was born on this day so we’re gonna talk about one of the most famous sculptors of the 20th century. I know, so much fire  ⁣⁣
• Moore went against art school convention and didn’t model his sculptures in plaster or clay before he cast them, he just directly carved the materials. ⁣⁣
• Henry Moore wanted to highlight and respect the materials he was sculpting with, instead of covering up any flaws or smoothing each to perfection. The textures and weight of the materials SHOULD be immediately noticed. So for example, if he was working in wood, the finished product is going to show the grains, textures and all the things you think of in wood. ⁣⁣
• He believed that the material had and “intense life of its own” that was up to him to show to the viewer. ⁣⁣
• His main themes in his art were reclining or seated figures, or mother and child poses. He said, “There are three fundamental poses of the human figure. One is standing. The other is seated, and the third is lying down... Of the three poses, the reclining figure gives the most freedom, compositionally and spatially.”⁣⁣
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Two Piece Reclining Figure No. 9 by Henry Moore, 1968⁣⁣ @deyoungmuseum @deyoungmuseumcafe Ok brb about to recline and lounge in this garden
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Remember what I said yesterday about Canova’s plaster at @metmuseum ? Well sryyy today’s a new day and modeling in plaster is overrated with Henry Moore! Also he was born on this day so we’re gonna talk about one of the most famous sculptors of the 20

SUMMER LOVIN’ HAPPENED SO FAST! Does anyone else love seeing the preliminary sketch/model/cast of a famous work of art? It’s like a peek inside the mind of the artist and I loveee comparing how it looks to the finished piece. This is a plaster cast of one of my all time favorites sculptures by Italian artist, Antonio Canova. So before he transformed marble into soft-looking amazingness, he created this plaster model. The romance! ⁣
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“Cupid & Psyche” by Antonio Canova, 1794
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SUMMER LOVIN’ HAPPENED SO FAST! Does anyone else love seeing the preliminary sketch/model/cast of a famous work of art? It’s like a peek inside the mind of the artist and I loveee comparing how it looks to the finished piece. This is a plaster cast o

Just me about to relive my childhood and be a hot mess of emotions watching The Lion King and Toy Story 4 ⁣
• This painting is serving those cinematic/drama vibes that encourages us to craft stories around what we think is going on in this scene. What happened right before this and what’s going to happen next? Is she waiting for someone or is she here alone? Did her bumble date ghost her or is she about to have the time of her life singing along to Beyoncé?⁣ (tbh I love watching movies alone sometimes!)⁣ And is there anyone else in this theater?!
• It’s like we’re all at once silently observing her from a distance yet also feeling really close to her and intruding on this intimate scene. ⁣⁣
• “Great art is the outward expression of an inner life in the artist, and this inner life will result in his personal vision of the world.” - Edward Hopper⁣⁣
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“Intermission” by Edward Hopper, 1963⁣
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Just me about to relive my childhood and be a hot mess of emotions watching The Lion King and Toy Story 4 ⁣ • This painting is serving those cinematic/drama vibes that encourages us to craft stories around what we think is going on in this scene. Wha

If I told Calder to dial me on my mobile, I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t be getting a phone call ⁣⁣
• Alexander Calder’s first mobile was created in 1931, but it was fellow artist Marcel Duchamp who first used the name mobile to describe it. The word ‘mobile’, is a French pun meaning ’motion’ and ‘motive’.⁣⁣⁣
• Calder was a game changer in art because he was one of the first artists to challenge the idea that art is a static object. So BOOM! Kinetic sculptures became a thing⁣⁣
• Calder’s kinetic sculptures used to move with a motor, but he realized the predictable, pre-planned movements were a bit boring so then he decided let the art’s motion come from air currents. This created a more human and organic feel to his work.⁣⁣⁣
• And he was born today! Hbd Calder! ⁣⁣
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If I told Calder to dial me on my mobile, I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t be getting a phone call ⁣⁣ • Alexander Calder’s first mobile was created in 1931, but it was fellow artist Marcel Duchamp who first used the name mobile to describe it. The word ‘mo

Still Life Sunday🦋 ⁣⁣
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In the 1950s, Paul Wonner began to paint figuratively instead of in abstraction, which he had focused on during the earlier part of his career. He was inspired by 17th century Dutch still lifes and became known for these types of works. He took the style and realism of the traditional still life genre and made it his own. This def fits my chill, lazy Sunday vibes today. ⁣⁣
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Study for Still Life with Flowers and Butterfly by Paul Wonner, 1982 @psartmuseum 🦋
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Still Life Sunday🦋 ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ In the 1950s, Paul Wonner began to paint figuratively instead of in abstraction, which he had focused on during the earlier part of his career. He was inspired by 17th century Dutch still lifes and became known for these type

Tonight I’m gonna swing from the chandelier! But not this one because I’m obsessed with it and it’s at the Palm Springs Art Museum. This Sputnik-style chandelier got its name from the first satellite that ever orbited the earth in 1957. Its round shape and futuristic spice vibe was reminiscent of the Soviet Union's Sputnik satellite. Also shoutout to the REALEST electrician that changes the bulbs cuz this one has 365@psartmuseum
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Tonight I’m gonna swing from the chandelier! But not this one because I’m obsessed with it and it’s at the Palm Springs Art Museum. This Sputnik-style chandelier got its name from the first satellite that ever orbited the earth in 1957. Its round sha

Degas often depicted women in unflattering poses and moments, but I feel like this bad bitch still stands strong and owns herself
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Degas often depicted women in unflattering poses and moments, but I feel like this bad bitch still stands strong and owns herself

When they tell you to square away your one big target for the year #newyearnewme #amirightornah
• ⁣A very small me for scale. This is a massive 12 ft square painting and one of the largest Frank Stella works I’ve seen. ⁣⁣⁣
• The name of this work was inspired by an essay by the 18th century French philosopher, Diderot.⁣⁣
• Instead of trying to figure out what this means or emotions it represents, Stella wants you to focus on just what you see, like the colors. Paint itself becomes the object. ⁣⁣⁣
• ”But, after all, the aim of art is to create space - space that is not compromised by decoration or illustration, space within which the subjects of painting can live.” - Stella ⁣⁣⁣
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“Lettre sur les aveugles II” by Frank Stella, 1974⁣ @deyoungmuseum
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When they tell you to square away your one big target for the year #newyearnewme #amirightornah • ⁣A very small me for scale. This is a massive 12 ft square painting and one of the largest Frank Stella works I’ve seen. ⁣⁣⁣ • The name of this work was

I try to eliminate clichés, extraneous material, I try to make it exact. My painting is not an allegory or a story. It is more like a poem. - Joan Mitchell

Untitled by Joan Mitchell, 1957-58
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"I try to eliminate clichés, extraneous material, I try to make it exact. My painting is not an allegory or a story. It is more like a poem." - Joan Mitchell Untitled by Joan Mitchell, 1957-58

Smh when you said portrait, I thought you meant Portrait Mode, Thomas.⁣ Ughhhhhhhghhh ⁣⁣
“Elizabeth Platt Jencks” by Thomas Wilmer Dewing 1895⁣⁣
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Smh when you said portrait, I thought you meant Portrait Mode, Thomas.⁣ Ughhhhhhhghhh ⁣⁣ “Elizabeth Platt Jencks” by Thomas Wilmer Dewing 1895⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣

“There are always flowers for those who want to see them.” - Henri Matisse ⁣
• Yez Matisse, serving the positivity we all need right now!⁣
• This is actually Matisse’s last commissioned work before he passed away. If you aren’t familiar with Matisse, he was a famous, French artist known for his vibrant and expressive use of color and was part of the Fauvist/Modern movements. His painting “Joy of Life” is one of his most famous works and I did a post on it a couple of months ago. Scroll away cuz I photoshopped rosé into the scene and it’s pretty fire. ⁣
• This is a massive, heavy ceramic composition that measures 12 by 18 ft.⁣
• The artwork is based on a paper cutout by the same title. Later in Matisse’s life, around 1950, he stopped painting and instead used paper cutouts as his medium. Matisse was diagnosed with cancer and had surgeries that left him bedridden, so painting and sculpture became way too difficult to execute. So instead, Matisse and his assistants were able to work together to create these really cool, collage, cut-outs that he described as “the simplest and most direct way to express myself.” ⁣ ⁣
“La Gerbe” by Henri Matisse, 1953 ⁣
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“There are always flowers for those who want to see them.” - Henri Matisse ⁣ • Yez Matisse, serving the positivity we all need right now!⁣ • This is actually Matisse’s last commissioned work before he passed away. If you aren’t familiar with Matisse,

Light it up️ ⁣
• The artist, Dan Flavin, preferred to call his works “situations” instead of using a more common, formal term like “art installation”. This was partially because he liked to create art for a specific location vs. creating a piece that would then get placed at a tbd location or gallery. I think that’s LIT af because that meant each work you’re looking at is meant to be there and nowhere else. ⁣
• Known for his minimal light art, Flavin explored themes of color, light, technology and everyday life. His art wasn’t restricted to a plain, flat wall either. He liked creating corner pieces, like this one, that interacted with the architecture and design of the space. #sitespecific going strong.⁣
• I do love how the fluorescent bulbs cast a light on the entire space so it really is an experience to be part of his art. This room in @sfmoma has a few other Flavin “situations” so that you’re surrounded by the glow of neon. ⁣
• Most of his works weren’t given a title and instead dedicated to someone. ⁣
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untitled (in honor of Leo at the 30th anniversary of his gallery) by Dan Flavin, 1987⁣
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Light it up️ ⁣ • The artist, Dan Flavin, preferred to call his works “situations” instead of using a more common, formal term like “art installation”. This was partially because he liked to create art for a specific location vs. creating a piece that

Contemplating my summer bod lol. ⁣
• Painting but IRL. Magritte modeled this sculpture after a painting he did by the same name in 1962. In the final years of his life, he began to create sculptures based on his famous surrealist paintings. ⁣
• I’m getting classical sculpture/ancient Roman marble meets a nesting doll kind of vibe. Each section of the torso is nested within each other creating an illusion they’re receding in the distance.⁣ • Ok if you need me I’ll be off tanning in the @gettymuseum gardens.⁣
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“Delusions of Grandeur” by René Magritte, 1967⁣
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Contemplating my summer bod lol. ⁣ • Painting but IRL. Magritte modeled this sculpture after a painting he did by the same name in 1962. In the final years of his life, he began to create sculptures based on his famous surrealist paintings. ⁣ • I’m g

They always say time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself. ⁣ANDY WARHOL
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Small Torn Campbell's Soup Can (Pepper Pot) by Andy Wahol,1962⁣
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"They always say time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself." ⁣ANDY WARHOL ⁣ ⁣ "Small Torn Campbell's Soup Can (Pepper Pot)" by Andy Wahol,1962⁣

It was my parents room, but I made them trade me. #meangirls
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It was my parents room, but I made them trade me. #meangirls

The weekend: so close, yet so far. ️ Happy bday Andrew Wyeth⁣.
• Ok I’m particularly sentimental about this painting because my Dad got me a small print of this and it sat on my bookshelf when I was young. It was one of my first famous works of art I knew of that didn’t consist of waterlilies or ballerinas or girls at pianos (lmao looking at u Renoir). I remember thinking this was just about a girl just chilling and daydreaming, but then I got older, studied art and realized it had a darker, more interesting backstory.⁣
• This is based on the artist’s neighbor, Anna Christina Olson, in Maine. She had a degenerative muscular disorder and wasn’t able to walk so instead crawled to get around. ⁣
• The challenge to me was to do justice to her extraordinary conquest of a life which most people would consider hopeless. If in some small way I have been able in paint to make the viewer sense that her world may be limited physically but by no means spiritually, then I have achieved what I set out to do. - Wyeth⁣
• This was purchased in 1949 by Alfred Bar, the founding director of the Museum of Modern Art, for $1,800. ⁣
• Christina’s World has become an iconic piece of American art and for me, a symbol of perseverance and optimism. ⁣
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“Christina’s World” by Andrew Wyeth, 1948⁣
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The weekend: so close, yet so far. ️ Happy bday Andrew Wyeth⁣. • Ok I’m particularly sentimental about this painting because my Dad got me a small print of this and it sat on my bookshelf when I was young. It was one of my first famous works of art I

“A picture should be like sparks.” - Joan Miró ️
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Animated Forms by Joan Miró, 1935
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“A picture should be like sparks.” - Joan Miró ️ ⁣ ⁣ ⁣ "Animated Forms" by Joan Miró, 1935

Came thru drippin’⁣⁣⁣⁣
• Bought by The Getty Museum for $30 million, this painting is fittingly based on a Greek Myth involving lots of gold🤑. Here we see the lovely Danaë, who is unfortunately trapped in a secluded tower by her father because an Oracle told him that he’d be killed by her future son. So chill! But Zeus was into Danaë, so he snuck into her tower by turning himself into a shower of gold (lol). So long story short, the prophecy came true because after that rendezvous with Zeus, Danaë give birth to the hero Perseus who did indeed kill her father. The end!⁣
• Gentileschi painted this in the Mannerist style which meant less of a focus on perfectly balanced, realistic, idealistic reproductions from nature and instead exaggerated all those qualities. So think unrealistic but elongated graceful bodies and unnatural, theatrical-looking lighting. It’s like, let’s really highlight everything that looks perfect, but then be super extra with it cuz we love the #drama.⁣
• Speaking of being extra, I love the way her disheveled sheets have a nicer sheen than my highlight. ⁣⁣⁣⁣
• This subject was a fave among artists because it was a great little loop hole that allowed them to paint a seductive, nude female body under the guise of just staying true to the Greek Myth. ⁣⁣⁣⁣
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“Danaë and the Shower of Gold” by Oraio Gentileschi, 1621⁣⁣⁣ @gettymuseum ⁣⁣⁣
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Came thru drippin’⁣⁣⁣⁣ • Bought by The Getty Museum for $30 million, this painting is fittingly based on a Greek Myth involving lots of gold🤑. Here we see the lovely Danaë, who is unfortunately trapped in a secluded tower by her father because an Ora

Louis Vuitton x Yayoi Kusama dropped a throwback to their  collab at the LV pop up in Beverly Hills. Announced in 2012, before Kusama’s Mirror Infinity Rooms were dominating ur IG feed, this collection flew off the shelves. Good luck finding a new one. These are a rare find nowadays and will cost you five dollar signs on Yelp. #louisvuittonx
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Louis Vuitton x Yayoi Kusama dropped a throwback to their collab at the LV pop up in Beverly Hills. Announced in 2012, before Kusama’s Mirror Infinity Rooms were dominating ur IG feed, this collection flew off the shelves. Good luck finding a new on

bitch better have my Monet
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bitch better have my Monet

Basquiat’s back, babyyy.⁣
• Untitled, by Jean-Michel Basquiat, is back at home in LA after a whirlwind trip to the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris and the Brant Foundation in NY. Tfti. ⁣
• Basquiat spent months working on this painting, which was a bit out of the norm for him since many of his works were created in an energy-filled span of a few days.⁣
• Most skulls in art represent death and impending doom. Basquiat’s skulls are a little more complicated; they’re in between both worlds. While yes, the skull is indeed not the freshest specimen with its sunken face and checked-out eyes, it still has an energy about it. The short brushstrokes, lines and colors all add to the feeling of dynamic internal thought and movement.⁣
• This could be considered as Basquiat’s self-portrait. It was shown at his debut solo exhibition in NYC, which could explain the months of laboring, intensity and anxiety that went into this epic work.⁣
• Currently #AtTheBroad @thebroadmuseum⁣ ⁣
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Basquiat’s back, babyyy.⁣ • Untitled, by Jean-Michel Basquiat, is back at home in LA after a whirlwind trip to the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris and the Brant Foundation in NY. Tfti. ⁣ • Basquiat spent months working on this painting, which was a

Twilight vibes, without the vampires🦇⁣
• This is the perfect depiction of that twilight dusk time of night where everything familiar seems suddenly mysterious and new.⁣
• Everything about this is focuses on the emotional aspects of the night instead of accurately depicting nature. Edvard Munch uses flowing lines, uneven brushstrokes and abstracts the landscape. The mound on the right side of the canvas represents a cluster of trees for examples. ⁣
• Nature is in perfect harmony in this as the sea, sand and sky all flow and blend into one. ⁣
• The stars pulsate in the sky, the shadowy figures on the white fence are mysterious and there’s something about the deep blue sky that just feels mystical. ⁣
• Edvard Munch painted this view from the Grand Hotel in Åsgårdstrand which is a small beach town south of Oslo, Norway. He spent many summers here and loved the natural landscape around him. ⁣
• Munch had a troubled life and suffered from mental breakdowns, but painting was his therapy and escape. In this painting we feel that emotional intensity, yet also the peace that Munch might have been striving for. ⁣
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“Starry Night” by Edvard Munch, 1893⁣
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Twilight vibes, without the vampires🦇⁣ • This is the perfect depiction of that twilight dusk time of night where everything familiar seems suddenly mysterious and new.⁣ • Everything about this is focuses on the emotional aspects of the night instead

When it’s time to Getty your ass out of bed and in the shower. #lookinlikeasnack #welcometola
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When it’s time to Getty your ass out of bed and in the shower. #lookinlikeasnack #welcometola

When Monday hits. ⁣
• Hbd Artemisia Gentileschi ⁣⁣
• Gentileschi painted this when she was only 17 years old! Yeah. I know. ⁣⁣
• This biblical story of Susanna was a popular theme in painting. But the way Gentileschi painted had a completely different take than your usual depiction. In her version. Susanna is fighting back against these creepy dudes are harassing her while she’s bathing. Usually, most paintings with this subject show Susanna as just being unaware. ⁣⁣
• The female protagonists in Gentileschi’s works are strong, heroic figures who are anything but just pretty decoration on a canvas.⁣⁣
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“Susanna and the Elders” by Artemisia Gentileschi, 1610⁣⁣
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When Monday hits. ⁣ • Hbd Artemisia Gentileschi ⁣⁣ • Gentileschi painted this when she was only 17 years old! Yeah. I know. ⁣⁣ • This biblical story of Susanna was a popular theme in painting. But the way Gentileschi painted had a completely differen

Forget the rose quartz and sage! Art is the new alchemy⁣⁣⁣⁣
• What’s so crazy yet so cool of her is that she required her artwork to not be shown until 20 years after her death. She believed the world wasn’t ready for her art. Now in 2019, her exhibition at the Guggenheim was the most visited in its 60 year history. Damn. ⁣⁣⁣⁣
• There’s something about her work that feels so unbelievably contemporary and 2019, despite being painted in the early 1900s. I could totally picture this one hanging over the fireplace of massive, trendy home in the Hollywood Hills. ⁣⁣⁣⁣
• She’s just now starting to get the glory of being the mother of abstract painting. She was already painting bold, colorful abstractions years befor Kandinsky, Mondrian and many others. ⁣⁣⁣⁣
• The pictures were painted directly through me, without any preliminary drawings, and with great force. I had no idea what the paintings were supposed to depict; nevertheless I worked swiftly and surely, without changing a single brush stroke. – Klint⁣⁣
• Ugh Hilma, you are the baddest b⁣
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Group X, No. 1, Altarpiece (Altarbild) by Hilma af Klint, 1915⁣⁣⁣⁣
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Forget the rose quartz and sage! Art is the new alchemy⁣⁣⁣⁣ • What’s so crazy yet so cool of her is that she required her artwork to not be shown until 20 years after her death. She believed the world wasn’t ready for her art. Now in 2019, her exhibi

“Are we to paint what's on the face, what's inside the face, or what's behind it?” - Pablo Picasso⁣
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• This is Dora Maar, who became one of Picasso’s muses. She was the inspo for his well-known “Weeping Woman” paintings. Picasso often showed her in sadness and distress. He felt that it wasn’t possible to paint her any other way. Even if she was smiling and chillin on the outside, Picasso only envisioned her crying. When he painted her, he described it as “obeying a vision that forced itself on me.” ⁣
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“Bust of a Woman (Dora Maar)” by Picasso, 1941⁣
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“Are we to paint what's on the face, what's inside the face, or what's behind it?” - Pablo Picasso⁣ ⁣ • This is Dora Maar, who became one of Picasso’s muses. She was the inspo for his well-known “Weeping Woman” paintings. Picasso often showed her in

⭐birthday bb ⭐ ⁣
•  I love looking at Frida Kahlo paintings because I can feel her reminding me to stay true to myself and to dgaf/stop caring what the world thinks. She was so bold, badass and determined and I admire her like crazy. ⁣
• This is the wedding portrait of her and Diego Rivera that she completed 2 years after being married.⁣
• “Diego is not anybody's husband and never will be, but he is a great comrade. - Frida Kahlo⁣
• From the way Frida holds Rivera’s hand in the painting to the focus on his artist palette, she is making it clear that he belongs to no one, but maybe his art. Despite all of this, she understood him and he understood her as she had affairs of her own. In this work, she is by his side, much smaller in size being the adoring wife. He is stiff and firmly planted to the ground, while she has a lightness as her feet barely stick to the ground. There was always something surreal and magical about how she appeared in her art. ⁣
• Mixing reality with fantasy in her art was one of the ways she worked through a ton of issues in her life. Honestly, talk about perseverance no matter what. I love the story of her  showing up to her own exhibition opening night in an ambulance with her bed set-up in the gallery. ⁣
• Ugh Frida Kahlo, you were such badass who continues to inspire (and still be trendy af in 2019)! ⁣
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“Frieda and Diego Rivera” by Frida Kahlo, 1931⁣
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⭐birthday bb ⭐ ⁣ •  I love looking at Frida Kahlo paintings because I can feel her reminding me to stay true to myself and to dgaf/stop caring what the world thinks. She was so bold, badass and determined and I admire her like crazy. ⁣ • This is the

Frida’s birthday made me do it!!
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Frida’s birthday made me do it!!

When u & ur bff can’t decide what to wear out ⁣
• Ernst Ludig Kirchner moved to Berlin in 1911 and became fascinated with the urban playground. His paintings reflect the city’s fast-paced movement, chaotic environment and casual encounters.⁣
• We see two prostitutes chilling. It looks like we caught them in moment between clients where they’re just passing time and swapping stories. To Kirchner, prostitutes became a symbol of Berlin and its rapid urbanization. While they represented fun and intrigue, they could also be transactional and impersonal. ⁣
• The room is covered in vivid, bright colors. There’s a lot crammed into a small space and it feels a bit claustrophobic. ⁣
• Kirchner, was one of the founders of Die Brücke (The Bridge). This movement was all about using intense, vivid colors to show extreme emotion in art. This also meant it that it was okay that the colors weren’t natural or realistic. ⁣
• They were trying to move away from the look of traditional paintings and create a new, unique style that would be the bridge (the name of this group) between the past and present. ⁣
• So conventions were thrown away and Kirchner painted in a way that was supposed to feel more instinctive and natural.⁣⁣
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“Two Nudes in a Room” by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, 1914⁣
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When u & ur bff can’t decide what to wear out ⁣ • Ernst Ludig Kirchner moved to Berlin in 1911 and became fascinated with the urban playground. His paintings reflect the city’s fast-paced movement, chaotic environment and casual encounters.⁣ • We see

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